Landmark environmental films: a Bay Day screening

Warning, Warning & Watermark Film Screening at David Brower Center

Hosted by David Brower Center
Saturday, October 1, 2–4 p.m.
2150 Allston Way, Berkeley, CA 94704

To celebrate the first annual Bay Day, enjoy a screening of  Watermark, a feature-length documentary by Edward Burtynsky that brings together diverse stories from around the globe about our relationship with water. The program will also include a screening of Warning Warning, a 1970 short film by Harvey Richards that helped build support for the Save the Bay movement.

 

Celebrate Sonoma’s shoreline this Bay Day

San Pablo Bay borders just a few square miles of Sonoma County, but its significance to locals is far greater than the area it covers.

It is part of our identity — after all, don’t we in Sonoma County refer to ourselves as the North Bay?

We rely on the Bay for recreation and the health of our economy. Its tidal wetlands sequester carbon, provide habitat for endangered and threatened species, filter bay waters, and protect us from sea level rise. The Bay is an extension of our open space — and as such, we at Sonoma Land Trust aim to protect it for future generations.

That is the motivation behind our Sears Point Restoration Project. After purchasing the property in 2005, Sonoma Land Trust began planning and fundraising to bring the tides back to 1,000 acres of former wetland at Sears Point, which neighbors the Sonoma Raceway and overlooks the Bay.

The project took 10 years, $17.9 million and the efforts of our amazing partners. The land was diked to create farmland in the mid-1800s and remained dry until Oct. 25, 2015, when we joined our partners and supporters to look on as we breached the levee and the waters of San Pablo Bay came rushing into to fill the tidal basin.

Photo by Michael Woolsey
Photo by Michael Woolsey

We immediately saw the effects of the returning tides.  Within a few days, shorebirds and waterfowl had already flocked to the restoration site. After the levee breach, the site was closed to the public for a few months while construction — which included a new 2.5-mile section of Bay Trail — was completed and finishing touches were put in place.

The Bay Trail was opened to the public on May 15, 2016, and the land was transferred to the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, becoming part of the San Pablo Bay National Wildlife Refuge. The site will take 20 to 30 years to shift from open water to a fully vegetated marsh — but, thanks to that new section of Bay Trail, it is a process that Bay Area residents can now bear witness to as they walk, hike or cycle for fun or to work.

Sonoma Land Trust formed a docent program for those who love and want to learn more about the Bay. Every Saturday, from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m., docents are stationed at the site with birding scopes, ready to impart their wisdom, dispense knowledge, or simply walk with visitors along the trail.

We are also celebrating Bay Day on Saturday, Oct. 1 at Sears Point! Local expert Roger Leventhal will give us a look into the future of the Bay, and teach us about climate change adaptation strategies as climate change continues to raise sea levels.

Afterwards, we will join the docents for a walk along the marsh. Whether you show up early for the talk or drop in for the marsh hike, it is a great way to celebrate Bay Day — and show how much you love the Bay.

Photo by Lance Kuehne
Photo by Lance Kuehne

This blog was written by Nicole Na, Sonoma Land Trust Communications Coordinator. 

Bay Day at Facebook HQ: Bratwurst, Beer & the Bay

FB Farmers Market

We’re thrilled to have Facebook as the lead sponsor of the first-ever Bay Day — one day for the entire Bay Area to come together and celebrate the Bay.

Facebook’s generous sponsorship is helping Save The Bay launch this amazing celebration at locations throughout the Bay Area. Their also hosting us at the Facebook Farmer’s Market on the company’s main campus.

Stop by the Save The Bay booth, then stick around for cocktails, live music and free activities for children and families. Bay Day is also Oktoberfest at the market, so you can salute the Bay with German specialties including pretzels, bratwurst, sauerkraut, and beer.

The Facebook Farmers Market is held in Lot 15 of Facebook’s Menlo Park campus, Saturdays from 2-5 p.m.

Find more great Bay Day events at www.bayday.org.

Bay Day Basics: The 5Ws

The Bay is alive and wild and that's why we are celebrating
The Bay is more than a stunning view — it’s alive, wild, and worth celebrating.

The first-ever Bay Day celebration is fast approaching! To help you get ready for the big day I’ve created the 5 Ws of Bay Day! These 5Ws consist of where, why, when, who, and where. Basically, everything under the sun you’ll need to know in order to have an awesome Bay Day on Saturday, Oct. 1!

What is Bay Day?

Bay Day is an annual celebration of San Francisco Bay. It’s like Earth Day but for the Bay!  Cities all around the Bay have officially declared Bay Day, and many community partners and local businesses are hosting celebrations, leading special Bay-themed programs, and offering discounts for the public.

Why are we celebrating it?

The Bay is home to not only a growing population but also to hundreds of different species of birds, fish and mammals. It is the largest and most ecologically important estuary on the West Coast, providing habitat for migrating shorebirds and larger mammals like porpoises and sea lions. When we take one day each year to celebrate this amazing natural resource, the movement to preserve and protect it for future generations grows stronger.

When is Bay Day?

Saturday, October 1, 2016. All day!

Who’s invited to celebrate Bay Day?

Everyone in and around the Bay Area is welcome to participate in Bay Day events and share their love for the Bay.

Where will Bay Day celebrations be held?

From Oktoberfest at the Napa Valley Museum to Port Fest in Redwood City the activities stretch across the entire Bay Area. Click on the links below to learn more about some of the Bay Day activates happening around the Bay Area on Oct. 1.

Find an event happening in your neighborhood at BayDay.org.

First Official Bay Day

The first-ever Bay Day is indeed turning out to be much more than an ordinary Saturday in October.

The extraordinary support we’ve seen for Bay Day has come from every corner of the Bay Area. This amazing expression of Bay pride would not have happened without the many Bay Area cities, community organizations, and small businesses that have all come together for San Francisco Bay.

It now serves as a culmination of community effort and support for the place we call home.

We’re so thankful to cities and local leaders who have answered our call to officially declare Bay Day in their communities, and to the Association of Bay Area Governments that helped us rally support across the Bay Area. Here’s the list of cities that are on board so far — and we expect many more to join the Bay Day bandwagon in 2017!

Accepting Union City's Bay Day Proclimation
Accepting Union City’s Bay Day Proclamation
Alameda
Albany
Belvedere
Benicia*
Brisbane
Burlingame
Contra Costa
Emeryville
Foster City
Hayward*
Marin
Martinez
Menlo Park
Napa
Newark
Novato
Oakland
Redwood City
San Francisco
San Jose
San Leandro
San Mateo
San Pablo
Santa Clara*
Santa Clara*
Sonoma*
Union City

*Formal action pending


Interactive Bay Day declaration map provided by the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG): http://abag.ca.gov/bayday/cities.html