Daily Digest

A “crowning symbol” of the restoration of the Bay, work on 2,635-acre Bair Island is nearing completion. This is a great opportunity to appreciate the Redwood City residents who stopped Mobil Oil’s development of the marsh in the 1980s. Restored wetlands provide wildlife habitat and protect communities from sea level rise caused by climate change. That’s why the San Jose Mercury News is calling on Silicon Valley to protect itself against sea level rise. Plus, local communities are cleaning up trash from waterways that flow directly to San Francisco Bay.

San Jose Mercury News 4/23/2012
Restoration of huge bay wetland near Redwood City nearing completion
For hundreds of thousands of motorists driving along Highway 101 every day, it is a vast expanse of dirt and grass, framed on the north by Oracle’s world headquarters and on the south by the Port of Redwood City. But to environmental groups and biologists, it is a crowning symbol of the ongoing restoration of San Francisco Bay, 2,635 acres that prove not everything has been diked, filled and paved.
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San Jose Mercury News 4/23/2012
Mercury News editorial: Silicon Valley must protect against catastrophic sea-level rise
In a visit to Silicon Valley earlier this month, U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein issued a timely warning about the potentially catastrophic effects of sea-level rise throughout the Bay Area and the need to act now to control the damage. She knows that water issues are likely to dominate California politics for the next decade.
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Contra Costa Times 4/21/2012
Volunteers clean up North Richmond creek for Earth Day
Alonzo Harden Jr. used a grabber to stir the sludge of North Richmond’s Wildcat Creek, pulling a plastic bag from among the spray cans, Styrofoam cups and other junk littering the murky water.
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Laney Tower 4/20/2012
Laney battles Merritt Channel pollution
Just east of the Laney parking lot lies the last stretch of the Merritt Channel before it empties into the Oakland Estuary. At the water’s edge, a snowy egret stalks a small frog that will become its next meal. Noise from the 880 freeway is muffled. In a cacophony of flapping and honking, a flock of Canada geese rises into the air. In their wake, an empty Doritos bag floats languidly on the water. It will be gone in a few hours, taken out to the Bay on the tide that flows through the channel. It’s a small sign of a much larger problem for the small, often overlooked marine habitat.
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