12 months of Bay photos: Get your Save The Bay 2018 calendar today!

2018 Save The Bay Calendar photos

 

I am thrilled to share with you the 2018 Save The Bay calendar, featuring beautiful photos of the Bay Area taken by our dedicated members and volunteers.

As the federal government continues to threaten environmental protections across the nation, our efforts to keep our Bay clean and healthy for wildlife and people have become more important than ever. The beautiful photos in this calendar illustrate what’s at stake: crucial habitat for wildlife, incredible views, and irreplaceable, flood-defending wetlands.

Your gift of just $10 or more will help mitigate the impacts of climate change on our communities, restore wetlands, and reduce toxic pollution in the Bay Area. As a special thank you, we will send you the beautiful 2018 Save The Bay calendar to remind you of the beauty your donation is helping to save.

Make a special tax-deductible contribution of just $10 or more, and we’ll send you a copy of this gorgeous full-color wall calendar as our thank you.

Save The Bay’s calendar cover photo contest winner

After careful deliberation, the cover photo and images for next year’s calendar have been chosen! Congratulations to our 2018 Calendar Cover Photo Winner, Mike Oria! Mike’s photo, Day Break from Clipper Cove, highlights the Golden Gate Bridge’s lesser-known sibling, the eastern span of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge.

Day Break from Clipper Cove - Mike Oria

In addition to connecting San Francisco to the East Bay, here are some of our favorite facts about this bridge:

  1. You can bike the Bay Bridge! The 2.2 mile Alexander Zuckermann Bike Path spans between Oakland and Yerba Buena Island.
  2. The Bay Bridge has built in “corm condos” for double-crested cormorants. The eastern span of the Bay Bridge is equipped with special platforms, mirror boxes, constructed nests, and bird decoys, all meant to attract cormorants to the new habitat.
  3. The old Bay Bridge is being repurposed in creative ways. The Bay Bridge Steel Program is making materials from the old portion of the bridge available for creative reuse in civic and public art projects, like this statue at Joshua Tree National Park.