Our 2019 Calendar is Here!

  • Photograph by Kurt Schwabe, kurtschwabephotography.com

 

Save The Bay’s 2019 calendar is officially here! Thank you to everyone who participated in our photo contest and contributed to a truly inspiring and breathtaking collection of photos.  It was no easy task, but after hundreds of submissions and much deliberation, the 12 calendar winners have been selected. Jay Huang’s Blue Hour Fog received the most votes on Facebook, winning the People’s Choice Award to make the calendar cover.

The calendar offers a daily reminder of why we work so hard to protect the beautiful Bay we share. Each photo tells a different story of Bay appreciation, and we hope they inspire you as much as they inspire us. We reached out to some featured photographers to ask why they cherish the Bay and what inspired their incredible shots:

“Kayacking in Richardson’s Bay always changes my perspective, and sometimes it seems the birds and seals love the bay as much as I do.” – Jen Gennari: (jengennari.com)

“If it wasn’t for the Bay’s beauty, I never would have started out as a photographer.  There aren’t very many major metropolitan areas where you can photograph a dozen different bird species, including a bald eagle, in a single afternoon.  When I learned how close we came to losing this natural treasure in the ’60s, I wanted to do my part to support the Bay’s conservation today – so I’m thrilled to be a part of this year’s calendar!” – Colin Neikirk: (ccneikirk.myportfolio.com)

“The ever-changing San Francisco bay offers up a plethora of fascinating landscapes, from shoreline flora and fauna to grand vistas from atop its distant peaks. It is truly a nature lover’s dream.” – Mike Oria: (mikeoria.com)

“As the chilly morning fog hugs to the golden city, I click the photo integrating myself into the beautiful bay.” – Jay Huang: (Check out his Flickr)

“I’ve lived around the bay all my life. Whenever I seek stability I find myself along her shores. As stable as a crab against a wave.” – Sean Peck

“Without a doubt my favorite part of being a photographer in the SF Bay Area is chasing the magical and ethereal fog around and discovering new viewpoints from all the various mountaintops of this amazing place. There is a beautiful mixture of nature and urban life to behold here.” – Vincent James: (vincentjames.net)

Photographer Susie Kelly hopes her work inspires people to “preserve the Bay for the other species that live here,” and to “slow down and appreciate the beauty around us.”

Again, we extend a big thank you to every member of the community who submitted their Bay photos, and congratulations to our finalists! We hope the calendar reminds you why you love the Bay and inspires you to join our efforts to protect and restore our shorelines.

P.S. You’ll be able to get your 2019 Save The Bay Calendar from July with a donation of $25 or more. Check back soon! 

Big Wins for the Bay on Election Day

Dave Gordon

Voters across the state and region made their voices heard on Tuesday on a slate of measures that impact San Francisco Bay. From parks and water to transportation and land use, voters approved measures that will protect and enhance the Bay and rejected measures that posed a serious threat to the health of the Bay and Bay Area communities.

Save The Bay Action Fund endorsed these measures for the benefits they will provide for San Francisco Bay and Bay Area residents. Here is a brief summary of the results:

YES on Proposition 68 – WIN:

In a big win for the Bay, voters overwhelmingly approved Prop. 68, the statewide parks and water bond, which includes $20 million for Bay wetlands restoration, adding to Measure AA funds. This will accelerate important work to increase wildlife habitat, improve water quality, protect communities against flooding, and enhance public access to the Bay shoreline. In all, the bond includes more than $4 billion to ensure clean drinking water, provide more equitable access to our state’s parks, and protect California’s open spaces against wildfires, drought, and floods.

NO on Proposition 70 – WIN:

Voters soundly rejected this effort to hamstring the state’s ability to spend its cap-and-trade revenue. The Legislature currently spends these funds each year on programs that reduce greenhouse gas emissions and help communities most affected by pollution adapt to climate change. Prop. 70 would have locked up this revenue after 2024 unless the Legislature voted by two-thirds to release it – an unnecessary and burdensome hurdle to funding critical climate programs.

YES on Proposition 72 – WIN:

Voters easily passed this measure to incentivize rainwater capture and reuse. Encouraging rainwater storage and reuse is smart policy that benefits the Bay and all of California.

YES on Regional Measure 3 – WIN:

In this important region-wide race, voters approved RM3 to relieve Bay Area traffic, helping to reduce roadway and air pollution that threatens the health of the Bay and the air we breathe. Through a $3 regional bridge toll increase that will be phased in over six years, RM3 will fund critical public transit and highway improvements like replacing aging BART cars, improving Caltrain and Muni service, and easing freeway bottlenecks in the East Bay. These projects will help keep vehicles off the road, ensuring cleaner air and water for us all.

NO on San José Measure B, YES on San José Measure C – WIN:

In a tremendous victory, San José voters rejected Measure B, which would have threatened the city’s open space, wildlife habitat, and creeks that feed the Bay. This was a deceptive attempt by developers to circumvent environmental and public review, skirt affordable housing requirements, and avoid paying millions in traffic and community impact fees. Voters also approved Measure C, which would have prevented the worst aspects of Measure B and now gives the San José City Council more power to reject future development proposals that promote sprawl and do not meet certain requirements on affordable housing, environmental review, and traffic impact fees. Save The Bay joined a grassroots effort that defeated Measure B, despite being massively outspent by developers.

Vote for the Bay by June 5!

This is the third and final blog in our series on the June ballot measures that will affect San Francisco Bay.

If you’ve read our previous posts in this series, you’ll know about a couple of the important measures on the June ballot that will affect San Francisco Bay. Proposition 68, the parks and water bond, includes $20 million for Bay wetlands restoration, adding to Measure AA funds. Regional Measure 3 would help relieve Bay Area traffic, reducing roadway and air pollution that threatens the health of the Bay and the air we breathe.

Save The Bay Action Fund has endorsed these measures for the benefits they will provide for San Francisco Bay and Bay Area residents. Here are Save The Bay Action Fund’s voting recommendations on other measures on this Tuesday’s ballot:

NO on Proposition 70 – Obstructs Climate Change Spending: Proposition 70 would hinder the Legislature’s ability to allocate money from the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund (GGRF), which holds revenue from the state’s cap-and-trade program. The Legislature currently allocates GGRF funds each year to programs that reduce greenhouse gas emissions and help communities most affected by pollution adapt to climate change. This measure would lock up GGRF revenue after 2024 unless the State Senate and Assembly both vote by two-thirds to release it.

YES on Proposition 72 – Incentivizes Rainwater Capture and Reuse: Proposition 72 would prevent property tax increases on homeowners who install rainwater capture and reuse systems, benefiting San Francisco Bay and California by storing and reusing water.

NO on Measure B in San José – Endangering Open Space and Weakening Affordable Housing Requirements: Measure B creates a precedent for developers to build projects that threaten open space, including Coyote Valley’s farmland, wildlife habitat, and creeks that feed the Bay. It would create a large, gated subdivision of million-dollar homes and huge profits for developers while weakening affordable housing requirements and costing taxpayers millions of dollars each year.

YES on Measure C in San José – Preventing Sprawl and Ensuring Affordable Housing: Measure C would prevent the worst aspects of Measure B by giving the San José City Council more power to reject future development proposals that promote sprawl. The measure would require developers to include more affordable housing in their proposals, conduct environmental and fiscal review, and pay traffic impact fees.

Read about all these measures in our full June voter guide.

Saving The Bay with Local Companies: Why a Former Staffer Got us Outdoors with Autodesk

Seth goes fishing off the coast of Marin County

“I’ve always had a love of nature, but my work at Save The Bay introduced me to the wonder of wetlands, which were off my radar before.”

A native of Marin County, Seth Chanin grew up just a block away from San Francisco Bay. As a kid, this former Save The Bay staffer spent weekends roaming the beach, kayaking the Bay, and biking rugged hillsides.  As an adult? Nothing’s changed for Seth. “Water really is a place of reflection, of solace for me.”

It’s why Seth spent his college years studying Environmental Science and Economics, the ideal combo for a self-described “business hippie.” Yet, Seth says it was his former role as Save The Bay’s Habitat Restoration Program Manager that inspired him to “always look at the landscape through ecologist’s glasses – understanding that we have increasing human populations, increasing demands on the land, and new challenges posed by climate change.”

Now, as Autodesk’s Employee Impact Engagement Manager, he seeks volunteer opportunities for his colleagues that are bound to spark a “high-impact experience.” Seth hopes these volunteer events “will open their eyes to important work being done in their communities, so they come back and do skill-based and pro bono volunteering with organizations like Save The Bay.”

Autodesk employees get outdoors to transplant seedlings

He’s convinced non-profits and leading Bay Area companies have much to gain from connecting – when they actually do connect. “There’s a huge need on non-profit side, resources and good intentions on the corporate side, but they’re often like ships passing in the night.”

Yet, Save The Bay and Autodesk recently broke through the barriers, proving these partnerships don’t just spark change – they get people smiling.

Of course, there was plenty of prep involved to share our work fighting threats from climate change. Save The Bay’s Restoration team essentially brought an entire nursery to the Autodesk campus. It meant sterilizing all the soil and pots it would take to transplant 10,000 seedlings.

Somehow, they got it done in time for 200 Autodesk employees to head outdoors last Thursday and help us transplant all 10,000. Their hard work translates to roughly 25% of the plants we’ll install for the year. Save The Bay’s Restoration staff was thrilled to share the science and importance of wetland restoration with so many new faces.

Seth pitches in with a former colleague at Save The Bay, Kristina Watson (photo credit: Ray Mabry)

The event fit right in to Autodesk’s Global Month of Impact and their offices happen to be just 15 minutes from our Bel Marin Keys restoration site where we’re using cutting-edge technology to build up more than 40 acres of wetland habitat.

Better still, Seth says he can already envision some long-term opportunities for both parties. “It’s exciting to expose our employees to something new and get them thinking about the design aspect of ecological restoration – because they make the tools used to design and make just about anything, including the barriers that will help protect Bay Area communities from rising waters.”

Save The Bay, meanwhile, looks forward to even more volunteer partnerships with Bay Area companies. We couldn’t agree more with Seth when he stresses: “it’s an important time to think about what’s happening in our backyard – and to apply our skills right here to solve those problems.”

Regional Measure 3 Reduces Traffic, Helping Keep Our Bay Cleaner

Photo by Vincent James

This is the second in three posts about June ballot measures that affect San Francisco Bay.

Bay Area residents know all too well the gridlock on our roads and highways. Our region’s rapid growth has put a significant strain on our transportation infrastructure, with more cars on the road, more passengers packing trains and buses, and longer commute times.

All of this growth has a direct impact on the health of our Bay, as more vehicles crowd roads and highways that parallel the shoreline and cross the water. When cars sit in bumper-to-bumper traffic along I-880 or inch along the Bay Bridge, more oil runs off onto roads and washes into the Bay, and more particulate matter and greenhouse gas emissions pollute the air and threaten Bay water quality.

Regional Measure 3 (RM-3) will help reduce gridlock and improve public transit throughout the region. Through a $3 regional bridge toll increase that will be phased in over six years, RM-3 will fund critical public transit and highway improvements. These include:

  • Replacing aging BART railcars and extending BART to San José and Santa Clara;
  • Improving Caltrain, SMART, Muni, and ferry service; and
  • Easing freeway bottlenecks in the East Bay and Peninsula.

But this isn’t just about protecting the Bay. Less traffic means less pollution in our communities, particularly those of us in lower-income neighborhoods that are located in the shadow of freeways or next to major thoroughfares – many of which are also near the Bay shoreline. These communities have borne a disproportionate burden from pollution for decades, and they are also more at risk from the effects of climate change. Our region needs immediate traffic relief and transit upgrades not only to keep our Bay cleaner, but also to ensure cleaner air for us all.

RM-3 is endorsed by: Save The Bay Action Fund, League of Women Voters of the Bay Area, U.S. Senator Dianne Feinstein, Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf, San Francisco Mayor Mark Farrell, San José Mayor Sam Liccardo, the Bay Area Council, the Silicon Valley Leadership Group, SPUR, and TransForm.

For details on all measures affecting the Bay, read the full June voter guide from Save The Bay Action Fund.