Guess Who’s Coming Back to the Bay!

I’m always stunned by what I find in my own backyard. Living near and commuting across the Bay, I keep stumbling on local treasures — an amazing view of the harbor from Noe Valley, or the Bay Bridge shimmering against the bright lights of rush hour traffic. I’m also discovering that I share a home with some surprising creatures- buffalo in Golden Gate Park, parrots in North Beach, even a river otter in the Sutro Baths.

But most surprising of all to me are the creatures that made their home here before I ever did, disappeared during World War II, stayed away for decades, and then one day, showed up under the Golden Gate Bridge.

Porpoiseemail_graphic

San Francisco Bay was once home to harbor porpoises, where they dwelt happily for hundreds of years. But in the early 1940s, they fled the Bay, which had become too dangerous and polluted to call home. Since then, a whole generation of Bay Area folks has grown up here, never knowing that porpoises once lived, played, and thrived right in their backyard. Now, more than 70 years later, they’re coming back. 

Why, after all this time, are they returning? Early signs point to better water quality and the overall health of the Bay as the most important factor. So far, nearly 300 porpoises have been spotted under the towers of the Golden Gate Bridge, one of their favorite spots for fishing… and mating.

It’s exciting to think that these porpoises may be the first of many harbor porpoises that make their home in the San Francisco Bay.  But the truth is, this is a small and delicate start. There’s still much to be done to improve the water quality of the Bay. If many of us still don’t want to swim in and fish in it, why would a large mammal, sitting at the top of the food chain?

That’s why we’re asking the San Francisco Water Board to help us clean up the Bay, by standing up to the major corporations- like C&H Sugar and Tesoro Refining- who are polluting our backyard and endangering these porpoises. If you want to see even more porpoises coming home to the Bay, tell the San Francisco Regional Water Board to stand up to polluters right now. Better yet, spread the word. Help us reach our goal of 5,000 signatures by Earth Day (April 22nd).

792266_415137831905774_1751350345_o

The Bay is such a big part of what makes living here special- why we’re some of the happiest people on the planet. But after suffering years of pollution, shoreline encroachment, and neglect, the Bay is not in the shape it used to be in. And that’s why we’ve launched For The Bay: to bring people like you and me together to reclaim the treasure of our region, the San Francisco Bay –our backyard, our playground, home to diverse creatures, like the harbor porpoises.

 

2 thoughts on “Guess Who’s Coming Back to the Bay!

  1. I can’t find on your site where it states that the Water Board is NOT standing up to the major corporations (or how it’s not).

    I don’t doubt it’s true, it’s just very vague. And other blogs are repeating the same thing… “sign this petition …because we say so” is the effect.

    Please provide background and factual citations.

  2. Great question! We are calling on the SF Bay Water Board to make greater strides toward a cleaner, healthier Bay – by raising the bar and standing up to chronic polluters like C&H and Tesoro refineries. Like all state regulatory agencies, the board faces pressure every day from well-financed interests who are perfectly willing to compromise our natural resources. They need to know that you and other members of the public are watching and support strong action for a clean Bay. After 50 years of standing up against every imaginable plan to fill and pollute our Bay, Save The Bay knows that we can’t afford to be complacent and accept “business as usual”. That’s why we’re mobilizing citizens across the Bay Area who are ready to make the San Francisco Bay cleaner and more beautiful than it’s been in a long time. We hope you will join us in taking action. For more information check out our comprehensive pollution prevention plan: https://www.savesfbay.org/pollution-prevention

Comments are closed.