Top 4 bayside restaurants and bars in San Francisco

The City of San Francisco is not only home to some of the world’s finest and diverse cuisine, spectacular views of San Francisco Bay are also visible throughout the city. Here are a few of our favorite bayside spots to grab a drink and a bite to eat in the City by the Bay.

  1. The Ramp 

    The Ramp (b)
    Originally a Mission Bay bait shop in the 50’s, The Ramp now provides a variety of eats and drinks. On warmer weekend days, they fire up the outdoor grill and get people dancing with live Salsa or Brazilian music. So grab some Huevos Rancheros and mull over their drink menu. They have 14 beers on tap and a variety of fruit-filled cocktails. I’d recommend trying the Mango Margarita or Jalapeno Grapefruit Martini.  Woody Allen also filmed a scene from Blue Jasmine at this location.

  2. Waterfront Restaurant 

    waterfront5 (P)
    Are you looking for something fancier and a bit upscale? Since 1969, the Waterfront Restaurant serves the tastiest locally sourced farm-to-table produce and sustainable seafood in the area. Some local favorites include Handmade Seafood Linguini Lobster and a Dungeness Crab Sandwich. Wash it all down with a Ginger Collins or Pomegranate Margarita. Its waterfront location along the Embarcadero offers beautiful views of the Bay, making this the perfect place for an enchanting night out with friends and loved ones.

  3. Greens Restaurant 

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    Owned and operated by the San Francisco Zen Center since 1979, Greens Restaurant is considered one of San Francisco’s finest vegetarian restaurants. Its flavor-packed menu will surely tantalize your taste buds. Enjoy some our favorites like the Farm Fresh Asparagus appetizer or the Wild Mushrooms Sheppard’s Pie. You can complement those dishes with a nice glass of pinot noir or a cup of organic loose leaf tea while gazing at the Golden Gate Bridge.

  4. Ferry Building 

    Ferry building (B)
    Nestled alongside the shores of San Francisco, the Ferry Building is home to a vibrant artisan food community and features a variety of Bay Area shops, regional microbreweries and wineries, and local eateries.  The palpable buzz in the building and its structure harkens back to a different age and captures that once port city feel, making it a unique place to visit. While you’re there, try the modern Vietnamese food at the Slanted Door, seafood at the Hog Island Oyster Company, or grab a delicious burger at the American Eatery. Additionally, on Saturdays, the Center for Urban Education about Sustainable Agriculture (CUESA) hosts a weekly farmers market in the plaza.

Ecoliteracy: Are People Like Squashes?

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An old zen tale

Allow me to bend your ear with an old Buddhist fable. There once was an old monastery with a garden out back. One day, the head monk heard an assortment of shouting coming from the garden. Upon inspection, the monk observed that all the squashes were fighting. The wise master asked them to calm down and touch the tops of their heads. The squashes were surprised to find vines attached to their tops. They all followed their vines back to one big plant. The squashes celebrated joyfully with the realization that they were part of the same interconnected family.

People, like the squashes in the beginning of the tale, often forget that they are connected to nature and each other. We repeatedly pollute and destroy natural environments that we perceive as unrelated. But scientists and ecologists have come to understand the connectivity of all living organisms and their related natural environments. The world is really just a bundle of overlapping ecosystems. To hurt one, is to hurt the other.

Ecopsychologists seek to understand why human behaviors continually damage the earth. If self-preservation is one of our most embedded natural instincts, then why would we consciously hurt ourselves? In other words, why are we constantly hurting natural environments that will in turn hurt people? Like the squashes, are we simply unaware that we are connected to nature?

To answer these questions, we’ll turn to the original ecologists—the Buddhists. Many in this tradition argue that our anthropocentric and self-centered mindsets create a lack of feeling and connection to the natural world, leading to the delusion of separation. This rift then creates a fragmented self, separate from other things. Conflicts then arise in this fragmented state, between the “self” and the “other.”

 We all could use a tall glass of ecoliteracy

Chances are you probably won’t be able to find the word “Ecoliteracy” in the dictionary. Ecoliteracy is just a modern scrunching together of two words: Ecology—relations and interactions between organisms and their environments, and Literacy—the state of being literate. Ecoliteracy can plainly be defined as the ability to comprehend the many interrelated natural systems that maintain the earth. Educators in the field of ecoliteracy, aim to teach awareness and comprehension around ecological communities, emphasizing human behaviors and impacts. So how can we become ecoliterate?

Get ’em while their youngEB3

If children are like sponges, then adults are like faucets. Meaning—that while children absorb and learn at incredible rates, what they absorb is often determined by what we expose them to. David Orr, a distinguished environmental studies professor, suggests that our meager comprehension of ecosystems and sustainable practices, are the result of poor education, and that we particularly fail to teach young students about being a part of nature. As the digital age and growing urbanization of the world increases, children experience longer periods of isolation from natural environments. Author Richard Louv, credited with inspiring a worldwide movement in re-connecting children back to nature, describes today’s child as experiencing a kind of “nature deficit disorder.” The lack of natural exposure and experiences for children often negatively affects their individual growth and our overall society.

It’s not enough to just provide students with classroom lectures, books or computer programs—when teaching environmental relationships. They may learn intellectually, but lack a genuine connection to the natural environment. Young people need the experience of nature to feel connected to it. Research suggests, that teaching children about the environment at a young age leaves lasting influences that remain into adulthood. Children need this connection with nature to prosper mentally and physically, as individuals and as communities (Witt & Kimple, 2008).

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The San Francisco Bay wetlands     

 It can be hard to find and connect to nature in cities and urban areas. Luckily, the San Francisco Bay Area is crammed with green spaces and places to experience wildlife. The Bay Wetlands are rich in biodiversity, teeming with wildlife and hundreds of plant species. By walking or biking the Bay Trail with family, kayaking along the SF Water Trail with friends, or even just having a picnic at McLaughlin East Shore Park, one can experience a variety of wildlife and local vegetation, not to mention impressionistic like sunsets and tranquil waters. The Bay Wetlands are considered the heart and lungs of the Bay, boasting over 400 native species.

So how can we get children to both learn about and experience the Bay Wetlands? The Bay currently needs 100,000 acres of tidal marsh to be considered healthy. Restoration efforts from organizations like Save The Bay, are currently maintaining 45,000 acres of healthy marsh, with plans for restoring another 30,000 acres. Save The Bay’s Restoration Education Programs are designed to get educators, middle and high school students out into nature. Our curriculum not only meets STEM requirements, but also provides students with the opportunity to get their hands dirty and restore the Bay Wetlands themselves. This immersive outdoor experience strengthens one’s connection to the environment, providing children with the enrichment they need to develop into healthy nature-loving adults.

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Just a big kid yourself? Not to worry. Save The Bay also engages volunteers, schools and businesses in shoreline restoration and scientific monitoring. Whether you’re a large corporation looking for some team building exercises, or just a small family looking to support your local community, Save The Bay offers a variety of hands-on activities from planting to shoreline cleanup.

Looking forward

Unlike squashes, humans don’t have vines attached to the tops of their heads. Because we have trouble tracing our interconnectedness back to a source, we often accidentally hurt each other and the surrounding world. But, by becoming more ecoliterate and re-connecting back to nature, we begin to see our hidden vines, and discover our connection to each other and the beauty around us.

20 Instagram-Worthy Spots Around SF Bay

Pictures often remind us that there’s really no place like San Francisco Bay. At Save The Bay, we love to see and share all of your Bay photos on our Instagram. Whether you’re taking a photo from your kayak, or just walking along a stretch of the 500-mile San Francisco Bay Trail, our picturesque region is ripe for exploration and will surely make your Instagram look 💯 ! Here are our favorite spots around the Bay to take photos.

 

Fort Baker, Sausalito

SF’s cloud game is on point! #goldengatebridge #sausalito #sfbay #MyBayPhoto Credit: @davidyuweb

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Middle Harbor Shoreline Park, Oakland

Simply stunning. #sfbay #oakland #eastbay #sunset #MyBayPhoto Credit: @speck5150

A post shared by David Wilde (@davidwilde7433) on

 

Angel Island State Park, Tiburon

Dreaming of sunnier days, warm weather, and an island getaway. #MyBayPhoto Credit: @mariahhark

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César Chávez Park, Berkeley

 

Alviso Marina State Park, San Jose



 

Shoreline Park & Lake, Mountain View

 

Port of Richmond, Richmond 



 

San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park, San Francisco

 


 

China Camp State Park, San Rafael

 

McLaughlin Eastshore State Park, East Bay



 

Adobe Creek Loop Trail, Palo Alto

 

Coyote Point Recreation Area, San Mateo



 

Benicia Waterfront, Benicia

 

Albany Bulb, Albany



 

Point Isabel Dog Park, Richmond

 

 

San Pablo Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Vallejo

 



 

Point Pinole Regional Shoreline, Richmond

 

 

Hamilton Field, Novato



 

South Beach, San Francisco

 

Berkeley Marina overpass, Berkeley