Top 4 bayside restaurants and bars in San Francisco

The City of San Francisco is not only home to some of the world’s finest and diverse cuisine, spectacular views of San Francisco Bay are also visible throughout the city. Here are a few of our favorite bayside spots to grab a drink and a bite to eat in the City by the Bay.

  1. The Ramp 

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    Originally a Mission Bay bait shop in the 50’s, The Ramp now provides a variety of eats and drinks. On warmer weekend days, they fire up the outdoor grill and get people dancing with live Salsa or Brazilian music. So grab some Huevos Rancheros and mull over their drink menu. They have 14 beers on tap and a variety of fruit-filled cocktails. I’d recommend trying the Mango Margarita or Jalapeno Grapefruit Martini.  Woody Allen also filmed a scene from Blue Jasmine at this location.

  2. Waterfront Restaurant 

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    Are you looking for something fancier and a bit upscale? Since 1969, the Waterfront Restaurant serves the tastiest locally sourced farm-to-table produce and sustainable seafood in the area. Some local favorites include Handmade Seafood Linguini Lobster and a Dungeness Crab Sandwich. Wash it all down with a Ginger Collins or Pomegranate Margarita. Its waterfront location along the Embarcadero offers beautiful views of the Bay, making this the perfect place for an enchanting night out with friends and loved ones.

  3. Greens Restaurant 

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    Owned and operated by the San Francisco Zen Center since 1979, Greens Restaurant is considered one of San Francisco’s finest vegetarian restaurants. Its flavor-packed menu will surely tantalize your taste buds. Enjoy some our favorites like the Farm Fresh Asparagus appetizer or the Wild Mushrooms Sheppard’s Pie. You can complement those dishes with a nice glass of pinot noir or a cup of organic loose leaf tea while gazing at the Golden Gate Bridge.

  4. Ferry Building 

    Ferry building (B)
    Nestled alongside the shores of San Francisco, the Ferry Building is home to a vibrant artisan food community and features a variety of Bay Area shops, regional microbreweries and wineries, and local eateries.  The palpable buzz in the building and its structure harkens back to a different age and captures that once port city feel, making it a unique place to visit. While you’re there, try the modern Vietnamese food at the Slanted Door, seafood at the Hog Island Oyster Company, or grab a delicious burger at the American Eatery. Additionally, on Saturdays, the Center for Urban Education about Sustainable Agriculture (CUESA) hosts a weekly farmers market in the plaza.

20 Instagram-Worthy Spots Around SF Bay

Pictures often remind us that there’s really no place like San Francisco Bay. At Save The Bay, we love to see and share all of your Bay photos on our Instagram. Whether you’re taking a photo from your kayak, or just walking along a stretch of the 500-mile San Francisco Bay Trail, our picturesque region is ripe for exploration and will surely make your Instagram look 💯 ! Here are our favorite spots around the Bay to take photos.

 

Fort Baker, Sausalito

SF’s cloud game is on point! #goldengatebridge #sausalito #sfbay #MyBayPhoto Credit: @davidyuweb

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Middle Harbor Shoreline Park, Oakland

Simply stunning. #sfbay #oakland #eastbay #sunset #MyBayPhoto Credit: @speck5150

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Angel Island State Park, Tiburon

Dreaming of sunnier days, warm weather, and an island getaway. #MyBayPhoto Credit: @mariahhark

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César Chávez Park, Berkeley

 

Alviso Marina State Park, San Jose



 

Shoreline Park & Lake, Mountain View

 

Port of Richmond, Richmond 



 

San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park, San Francisco

 


 

China Camp State Park, San Rafael

 

McLaughlin Eastshore State Park, East Bay



 

Adobe Creek Loop Trail, Palo Alto

 

Coyote Point Recreation Area, San Mateo



 

Benicia Waterfront, Benicia

 

Albany Bulb, Albany



 

Point Isabel Dog Park, Richmond

 

 

San Pablo Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Vallejo

 



 

Point Pinole Regional Shoreline, Richmond

 

 

Hamilton Field, Novato



 

South Beach, San Francisco

 

Berkeley Marina overpass, Berkeley

Top 5 Holiday Activities around the Bay

I love being home for the holidays. Being back in the Bay means walking my favorite trails, shopping downtown and catching up with old friends. I have many traditions around the holidays with my family and friends. My favorite tradition is meeting up with my friends from high school at our favorite café to grab some warm drinks and walk along Ocean Beach. Spending time with family and friends is a huge part of the holiday season. This year we hope you include the Bay in some of your holiday traditions. These are some of our favorite ways to celebrate the holidays on the Bay in style.

Embarcader in SF_4.8.15_Hai Nguyen_twt

  1. Spend time outside. Celebrate the winter solstice on Wednesday, Dec. 21 by stretching your legs and spending time outdoors. Enjoy a Bay view from the nearly 350 miles of the San Francisco Bay Trail or challenge your friends to hike to the top of Mission Peak in Fremont. Your legs will be burning but you’ll have a beautiful view of the Bay to enjoy while you catch your breath.
  2. See the Bay Lights. Everyone loves to admire the neighborhood Christmas lights, but this year take it a step further and enjoy the beautiful Bay Lights on the Bay Bridge. Grab a cup of hot cocoa and stroll along the Embarcadero to enjoy the amazing view of the lights over the Bay.
  3. River Otter Snow Day. We may not get snow days in the Bay Area but the river otters at the Aquarium by the Bay in San Francisco are getting a fresh snow day every Wednesday this month. Both kids and adults love to watch the cute otters as they slip and slide around in the snow. See the otters play in fresh snow every Wednesday from Dec. 7 to Dec. 28.
  4. Lighted Boat Parade. The lighted boat parade is an annual tradition put on by the Fisherman’s Warf Community Benefit District and the St. Francis Yacht Club. It started in 1994 and is the oldest and largest lighted holiday boat parade on San Francisco Bay. The best viewing spots are at Aquatic Park, Pier 39, Marina Green and Crissy Field in San Francisco. The parade takes place from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 16.
  5. Water sleigh ride on Lake Merritt. Enjoy a festive light-filled cruise around Lake Merritt in Oakland, complete with caroling and hot cider. Water sleigh rides will start at 6 p.m. on Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays, from Friday, Dec. 2 to Friday, Dec 23. Rides are $6 per person.

I hope you all get a chance to enjoy the Bay this holiday season and remember to take public transportation or carpool in an effort to help reduce the amount of pollution that flows into our Bay. Happy Holidays!

Sunnyvale residents advocating for a plastic-free California

Murphy Street Farmers Market
In Sunnyvale, using reusable bags has turned into a lifestyle rather than just a policy. Photo: Vivian Reed

Present-day Sunnyvale, California is known as “The Heart of Silicon Valley,” but if you walk into any grocery store or stroll through the downtown farmer’s market in this tech town you’ll notice another trend: people carry reusable bags when shopping.

Four years ago, my hometown hopped on the bag ban-wagon, joining our region’s largest cities including San Francisco, Oakland, and San Jose in working to address the Bay’s pollution problem.

Before Sunnyvale’s plastic bag ban went into effect in early June 2012, storefronts around town posted signs that read “Did you bring your reusable bags?”

To me this message was more than a friendly reminder—it revealed the city’s commitment to sustainability and curbing urban pollution.

Jessica Aronson supports Prop. 67. because it is the next step to saving our beautiful state.
Jessica Aronson supports Prop. 67. because it is the next step to saving our beautiful state.

My friends and Sunnyvale natives Jessica Aronson and Justin Matsuura were also thrilled about the new change and viewed this ordinance as a natural next step in ensuring a plastic-free California.

Unfortunately, ridding our state of this toxic non-biodegradable trash has turned into a drawn-out multiyear dogfight between California and out-of-state polluters.

So why are Californians forced to decide on a statewide plastic bag ban, again? The answer is simple: the Plastic Bag Industry cares more about making green than going green. That’s why there are two propositions on the November 2016 ballot about the same issue: Proposition 65 and Proposition 67.

Big Plastic has spent millions to fool voters into supporting Prop 65—a very regressive and disingenuous measure that would repeal the state’s existing ban approved by Governor Jerry Brown in 2014.

“It’s so frustrating that we have to fight so hard to protect our planet,” says Aronson. Keeping the bag ban to prevent toxic waste from building up around our homes and in our waterways seems like common sense.”

Having lived in an area where bags are banned, my friends and I know firsthand that transitioning to life without plastic bags is a natural adjustment that also makes you feel good.

On occasion store clerks have thanked and complimented Justin Matsuura for bringing his reusable bags to the store.
Store clerks have thanked and complimented Justin Matsuura for bringing his reusable bags to the store.

“I do feel better about the environment and myself when I pull out my reusable bags instead of using plastic bags,” says Matsuura. “Sometimes it even turns into a conversation starter!”

The simple act of bringing a reusable bag to the store quickly becomes second nature, making the experience of going to a store in a community where disposable bags are still legally distributed feel jarring.

“Traveling to areas without the ban seem bizarre.” Aronson explains, “It reminds me of how much waste people are still creating with single-use bags.”

In the years following the Sunnyvale Bag Ban, hardly any signs reminding shoppers to bring their reusable bags remain. And honestly, there is no real need for them anymore.

More importantly, this local ban has turned plastic bag litter into a problem of the past. A recent study reveals a 100% reduction in the number of single use plastic bags found in municipal trash capture devices. This is good news because stormwater is the largest source of pollution in San Francisco Bay.

Proposition 67 would allow cities throughout California to achieve similar victories in reducing plastic bag pollution. Matsuura believes this initiative will “keep our state trending in renewable, recyclable, and sustainable practices for our future.”

As Californians, we all favor policies that protect the environment and inspire sustainable choices. We also believe that intentionally destroying our environment for financial gain is not okay. That’s why our state’s most credible editorial boards, elected officials, and environmental leaders and organizations including Save The Bay vehemently oppose Proposition 65 and support Prop 67.

Join Jessica, Justin, and me next week in voting for a plastic-free California. It’s time to put the Golden State back on the map as an environmental leader invested not in financial gain, but in preserving this place we call home.

Vote YES on Prop 67 and No on Prop 65 on Nov. 8.

Photo: Vivian Reed


Learn more about the California Bag Ban on Save The Bay’s blog:

Op-Ed: Prop 67 bag ban stakes are global

Bigger than the Bag: the true promise of a state bag ban

Don’t be fooled by Prop 65


 

Humans of the Bay for Prop 67

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Bodie, my 8-month-old golden retriever, is pictured here during our walk at Ocean Beach.

My YES vote on Prop 67 will be for both Bodie and I.

Bodie is my 8-month-old golden retriever who, as you can imagine, likes to put anything and everything in his mouth.

Bodie2 (600x800) Toxic trash and plastic bag pollution are forever changing the landscape of the places Bodie and I once loved to escape to.
Toxic trash and plastic bag pollution are forever changing the landscape of the places Bodie and I once loved to escape to.

I love taking my puppy for walks along the scenic Bay Trail and out at Ocean Beach. Both places have always served as a magical place to get away from the hustle and bustle of city life. But the other day, I was brought back down to earth by the harsh reality that toxic trash and plastic bag pollution have forever changed the landscape of these places Bodie and I once loved to escape to.
Like most puppies, he likes to pick up everything off the ground from dirty socks to plastic bags and food wrappers despite my best efforts to keep a watchful eye on him. I support Prop 67 to ban plastic bags, not just because there will be less trash on the beach for my dog to eat and I won’t have to pull plastic trash out his mouth every 15 feet. It’s also because seabirds and marine mammals don’t have anyone there for every step of those 15 feet to watch over them, and to stop them from eating plastic bags. They often mistake plastic bags for nutritious food sources like jelly fish and are entangled, suffocated, or poisoned by toxic trash.

They, and Bodie, are relying on us Humans of the Bay to speak up for them.

By banning plastic bags in California we can drastically reduce the amount of plastic trash polluting our waterways and poisoning marine life. I am voting YES on Prop 67 to sustain the beauty of the San Francisco Bay and its wildlife for future generations. The passage of this important environmental legislation will hopefully influence other states to pass statewide bans as well.

But don’t just take my word for it, or even Bodie’s.  Listen to the reasons other Humans of the Bay for Prop 67 are stepping up in support of banning plastic bags in California.

 

 

Humans of the Bay
Click to view more Humans of the Bay for Prop 67.

Join me and the many other Humans of the Bay in voting YES on Prop 67 and NO on Prop 65 to uphold the statewide ban of plastic bags.